About Stratford Concert Choir

Originally called the Stratford Community Choir under the direction of Howard Dyck, the choir performed at the very first Summer Music Festival in 1981.  The group separated from the festival the next year and officially became the Stratford Concert Choir.

After Ray Daniels took over in 1982, the choir gradually came into its own, attracting new singers and performing more challenging repertoire.

Ian Sadler became artistic director in 1989.  During his 32-year tenure the SCC regularly delighted audiences with performances of works such as Handel’s Messiah, Mendelssohn’s Elijah and the Requiems of Brahms and Mozart.

The SCC has performed not only in Stratford but in various other Canadian provinces, as well as the U.S., England and France.  It is featured on five recordings, including 'KaChunk: 40 Years of Music for the Theatre' by Alan Laing and 'Lost Souls' by Loreena McKennit.

In January 2022, Brian Wismath became interim artistic director. 

Stephane Potvin took up the artistic director role in September 2022. He is originally from Québec. His 35-year career has taken him across Canada, the

United States and Europe. He has conducted choirs, orchestras and chamber ensembles, including the Hamilton Philharmonic Orchestra, the McGill Chamber Singers, the Orpheus Male choir,

the Niagara Children's Choir, and the Canadian Armed Forces Band.

He is the founder and artistic director of Musikay, a Hamilton-based group of professional musicians and singers dedicated to the performance of classical music.

The choir continues to share its passion for choral music by presenting a diverse program of great works, developing singers to a high standard of performance and collaborating with other arts organizations.

Someone Reading Sheet Music_edited_edited.jpg

Live music goes beyond notes and rhythms to communication and storytelling. While a recording of perfection is about the sound, live music is about the collective experience of everyone in the room.

bruce 2.jpg

Christmas Tree Lighting at the Bruce